Soul less talent-less but fucking adictive
  • *looking at my legs*:

    Oh my god why

  • *looking at my stomach*:

    Oh my god why

  • *looking at my arms*:

    Oh my god why

  • *looking at my face*:

    Oh my god why

  • *trying to exercise*:

    Oh my god why

  • *eating shitty food*:

    Oh my god why

  • *weighing myself*:

    Oh my god why

  • *looking at my life*:

    Oh my god why

  • *looking at my music taste*:

    cool man

Reblogged from fuckyeahmexico  850 notes
theatlantic:

The Writing on Mexican Walls Isn’t Graffiti — It’s ‘Vernacular Branding’

In central Mexico, walls are invitations to party. Since 1960, bardas de baile (loosely translated as “music walls”) have illuminated exurban and rural areas with colorful, hand-painted advertisements for music, dances, and carnivals. Although these work of homemade graphic design share some of the characteristics of graffiti, they are not tags - and they are tolerated by the authorities. The new book Mexican Wall Painting: Bardas De Baile (Ghost & Co., New York) by Patricia Cué, a designer and design teacher at San Diego State University, examines these expressive painted letterings and the subcultures that have developed around them.
Read more. [Image: Ghost & Co.]

theatlantic:

The Writing on Mexican Walls Isn’t Graffiti — It’s ‘Vernacular Branding’

In central Mexico, walls are invitations to party. Since 1960, bardas de baile (loosely translated as “music walls”) have illuminated exurban and rural areas with colorful, hand-painted advertisements for music, dances, and carnivals. Although these work of homemade graphic design share some of the characteristics of graffiti, they are not tags - and they are tolerated by the authorities. The new book Mexican Wall Painting: Bardas De Baile (Ghost & Co., New York) by Patricia Cué, a designer and design teacher at San Diego State University, examines these expressive painted letterings and the subcultures that have developed around them.

Read more. [Image: Ghost & Co.]